The CMO Show:
Bianca Bryson on emotive storytelling...

Bianca Bryson, Chief Marketing & Partnerships Officer at International Justice Mission sits down with Mark Jones to discuss how the marketing function is transforming, and how marketers can use creativity as an agent of change.

Research shows that more than 90 per cent of our purchasing behaviours – and our decision-making more broadly – is controlled by emotion.

This makes emotive storytelling – when used responsibly – a marketer’s most powerful tool for connecting meaningfully with customers and broadening a brand’s sphere of influence.

Bianca Bryson, Chief Marketing & Partnerships Officer at International Justice Mission, believes in the impact of brand storytelling and harnesses it to drive the organisation’s vision of a future where no-one lives outside the protections of law.

“We’ve got a lot of different caseworks. But our methodology from that point is to ensure that we tell the story in its raw and authentic level, because we don’t want to sanitise it, but we also don’t want to overdramatise it either,” says Bianca. 

“We’re dealing with people’s lives so we want to ensure that [their story] is told with dignity. We tell it in its raw and authentic way knowing that there will be a moment that is quite devastating for people. And we call that the ‘crushing moment’.” 

With a diverse marketing background – spanning Disney, Nestle, The Freedom Project and other brands – Bianca recognises that stories have the power to move us. 

“What’s really crucial for us is that we bring that message of hope. 66,000 people are rescued at this point by IJM. So movement and traction is happening and accelerating over time. People need to hear the stories.”

To hear more from Bianca and find out how marketers can use emotive storytelling to communicate a brand’s purpose and impact – tune into this episode of The CMO Show.

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The CMO Show production team

Producers – Charlotte Goodwin & Stephanie Woo

Audio Engineers – Tom Henderson & Daniel Marr

Got an idea for an upcoming episode or want to be a guest on The CMO Show? We’d love to hear from you: cmoshow@filteredmedia.com.au.

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Transcript

Host: Mark Jones

Guest: Anny Havercroft

Mark Jones:
No matter how much you like to think of yourself as a rational, logical person – we humans are first and foremost emotional creatures. The truth is that the majority of your customers’ decisions are based on how they feel at any given time. Storytelling is an effective way brands can connect to their audience. But, storytelling that’s rooted in truth and human emotion – tales of adversity, resilience and redemption – move us. These stories help brands differentiate from the pack, and amplify their impact. So how do you get to the heart through emotive storytelling?

Mark Jones:
G’day friends! Mark Jones here. How are you? Great to have you with us again on The CMO Show. My guest today is Bianca Bryson. She’s the Chief Marketing & Partnerships Officer at International Justice Mission, or IJM – the largest anti-slavery organisation in the world. Bianca has a diverse marketing background – having worked at Disney, Nestle, The Freedom Project. She has a passion for purpose, story and impact – you can feel it when you talk to her. We had a great conversation about how the marketing function is transforming, and how marketers can use creativity as an agent of change. Let’s go to my conversation with Bianca

Mark Jones:
Bianca Bryson, Chief Marketing and Partnerships Officer at International Justice Mission. Thanks for joining us. 

Bianca Bryson:
It’s great to be here.

Mark Jones:
We’re going to talk today about a really interesting and quite challenging topic, which is ending slavery. For anybody who doesn’t know International Justice Mission, a global organisation that fights slavery. Did I do the definition of the organisation justice there?

Bianca Bryson:
You did. You did well. Just to re-clarify, we’re the largest anti-slavery organisation in the world. So we’re not that well known yet in Australia, but globally, we are the largest.

Mark Jones:
Yeah. Well, I have the advantage of – we’ve done pro bono work many years ago with IJM. So I do know a bit about the story and honestly, this is kind of what I want to talk about today, is – there’s two parts. One of course, your role. But when you work for a cause like this, it’s arresting. It kind of grips you, right? You’re for it or you’re thinking about another cause, right? What’s that like?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Look, it’s really interesting from the perspective of – let me start with team. It’s a very dynamic, passionate team because everybody really cares about the cause. And our cause is dealing with people, like there’s this very strong human element to it. And so existing and leading a team in that context is very different from my past, dealing in FMCG corporations, where many cases you’re there for the job. Just to do the job, earn the money and whatever else, but yeah. In some senses, I would say it’s a family environment because everybody has this united pace that bonds us around the change that we’re seeking to make in the world. 

Mark Jones:
And we see that in many charities and across the for purpose sector is people who opt in, right? They want to be there. Is that what the team is like?

Bianca Bryson:
Yes, absolutely. Recruitment is really interesting. When you go through interview processes, there’s a lot of passion, usually behind people who are applying. They just want to make a difference in the world and they really care about the issue of modern slavery. And that can be all the various types of caseworks that we deal with. They may have a particular passion in one area of it, but ultimately it’s about they want their work to matter. It’s got to have purpose behind it. And so they bring those skill sets into the organisation.

Bianca Bryson:
Coming from a corporate background, you’re really judging people on their skills and their experience and that’s it. When you come into a not-for-profit space, you want people who not only have skills and experience, but who have passion. And if you’re not careful, the passion can trump the skills and experience. So that’s actually been a unique part of IJM’s journey I think in the last few years. Not that people prior didn’t have skills and experience, they absolutely did. In fact, we may talk a little bit about the curve of where IJM’s been, and you need different skill sets and passion at different stages of it. But right now, as we’re setting off for this growth and we’re wanting Australians by large knowing about modern slavery and caring about it, you need people who have really got some grunt behind them.

Mark Jones:
Yeah. And to that point, lawyers are a big part of the team at IJM, right?

Bianca Bryson:
They are. Yeah.

Bianca Bryson:
And look, we’ve had a little bit of a change in that focus in the IJM Australia office. So a lot of our work that we do from a legal perspective is out what we call in the field. So in the countries where we are rescuing and restoring and convicting, but here in the Australian office, we’ve had a bit of a switch towards more of an advocacy, political focus because we really need to work with our government. And so we have a lot of close relationships with MPs, we’re seeking to change legislation. We’re not necessarily doing the legal cases, but hands down, IJM was built on lawyers on a global scale.

Mark Jones:
That’s amazing.

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah.

Mark Jones:
Well, before we get too much further down the team side of things, I did also want to think about this from this broader marketing CMO perspective and the role that you have here. Again, talking about this cause. And it fascinates me, if you can follow me for a second. Entrepreneurs, when they start out on a journey, or even somebody who’s in a – if you like, a new or emerging sector, you have this aspect where you’ve got to educate people first before you can sell them your service or product. Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Absolutely.

Mark Jones:
So you’ve always got that dynamic. It’s not like you’re competing with lots of other anti-slavery organisations in Australia. I’m sure there are some, but it’s a very different dynamic. So what gives you the drive to, if you like, push to educate, to get people passionate about the same thing as you? Because really, that’s, if you like, the battle ground, is in the hearts and minds. Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah, absolutely.

Mark Jones:
How do we get people to care about your cause over all the other causes? Okay? And this is probably the greatest existential question you face in your role when you think about the stories you’re telling, about your role, it touches everything. The fundraising, the team, everything.

Bianca Bryson:
Yes, absolutely. And look, I think what you’re touching on is something that’s getting harder. People have got compassion fatigue. You think about the environment we’ve just gone through globally with COVID-19, people are tired of hearing about hard stuff. So it is hard, but you’re right. We have to get people passionate about what we care about. But not just because we care about it, because it actually does matter in the world and it’s making big issues in the world. So how do we do that? Gosh, we have a complex problem, really. We’re dealing with modern slavery, but we’re dealing with different aspects of it. Whether that is bonded forced labour, that talks about supply chain issues. Many corporations are dealing with that at the moment. Sex trafficking, police abuse of power, these things are all part of what IJM does.

Bianca Bryson:
And whilst we’re trying to do this at a systemic level, communicating that to the mass is a tough job. So storytelling’s a big part of how we do that. And we seek to sort of bring people into that space of caring about the one, and actually having the emotion behind it so that they are actually moved to want to do something about it. And there’s various forms of how their action can take place.

Mark Jones:
So I imagine then you’re sort of looking – there’s a mass market appeal, but also then finding those people who are going to be your champions, right? So really fostering those advocates and the people who are going to help amplify your message.

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah, definitely. I mean, obviously, when we’re doing our strategic plans, we’re thinking about the various audiences we want to talk to. Mass is definitely a big part of that because we need to get this on the Australian agenda in general. But also, we are a fundraising office as well as partly doing our advocacy work with government. So that means that we need large gifts. And so we focus on some major donors, philanthropic corporate partnerships is a new area for us, and we’re working with Westpac and also Thankyou as a consumer brand. And those partnerships, we needed all. So yeah, lots of messages, lots of audiences.

Mark Jones:
Well, and to your point, the Chief Marketing and Partnerships Officer, that’s an important part of this role, is how do we connect and work as part of an ecosystem of like-minded companies? So that’s really great to hear. It would be remiss of me to go too much further without firstly tackling this question of slavery, right?

Bianca Bryson:
Sure.

Mark Jones:
We’ve jumped straight into it because we have a familiarity.

Bianca Bryson:
Right.

Mark Jones:
I imagine people listening would be like, “Well, hang on a minute. Slavery?” 

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah.

Mark Jones:
This is a sleeper issue, if I could put it that way. Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Very much so.

Mark Jones:
We think that that was from times past. So what’s the extent of the problem in the world?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. So look, the latest statistics at the moment are 40+ million people are trapped in slavery. But the reality is we’ve got 5 billion people who are children, women, and men who are living outside of the protection of law. And IJM, when we talk about modern slavery, what we’re actually dealing with is protection. We’re dealing with systemic issues in the justice systems. So 5 billion’s really in a way our number. But if you think about the world population, there’s 7.64 billion people in the world.

Mark Jones:
I was just going to pick you up on that.

Bianca Bryson:
Right? So there’s really – we’re talking five-eighths, almost, of the world are living outside of the protection of law. And so the issue is vast. We do think that it was abolished years and years ago, but the reality is it still exists. And in all of the countries we work in, there are laws that exist to protect people against this, but they’re just not being protected for many, many reasons.

Mark Jones:
Does it go by other names in different countries in terms of how people get into what we would classify as slavery? For example, paying off a debt, those sorts of scenarios?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah, absolutely. I mean, we deal specifically – our niche in this is that we are dealing with everyday violence against the poor. So that’s our main concern. It’s people who are really vulnerable, but the reason that’s our main concern is because it’s people who are vulnerable that are actually trafficked and are tricked into the forms of slavery that we’re dealing with. So as you mentioned, there’s forced labour, there’s bonded labour. We can talk a lot about that in South Asia, for example, where one story is, one of our survivors needed medicine for their daughter who was only two years old. That would have in our currency cost $15. That’s all. They went to a local slave master to make a loan on that $15.

Bianca Bryson:
Naturally, he lent it, but what the terms are is that they have to work and come and live on the property with him. That brought them into years of trying to pay off a $15 debt, because they’re not given visibility to how much money they’re earning. They’re given very minimal food, if any. And often they’re working like 18 to 20 hour days, which feels unbelievable because how do you work 20 hour days and sleep four? But this is the actual reality, that these 40 plus million people are living in. They are trapped because they are vulnerable and it’s because they want simple things that we take for granted, like being able to purchase medicine for their two year old.

Mark Jones:
That’s astounding. So to that point, there is no shortage of stories.

Bianca Bryson:
Absolutely.

Mark Jones:
I’m sure that you could tell. So let’s swing around to just touch a bit on storytelling as part of your strategy. What’s the framework that you use to choose the right stories? And this is, I think, an important one because you mentioned compassion fatigue. I think, at a certain point, it doesn’t sort of work.

Bianca Bryson:
Absolutely. I think the first thing that we start with is – I bet as I said that number of 5 billion people, a lot of listeners probably switched off because it just feels daunting. Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. So we narrow it down to the one. Our starting point is this, who is the story of one? And obviously, we’ve got a lot of different caseworks, we’ve got to choose where that is. But our methodology from that point is to ensure that we tell the story in its raw and authentic level, because we don’t want to sanitise it, but we also don’t want to overdramatize it either. These are people that we’re dealing with and their lives and we want to ensure that it’s told with dignity. So we tell it in its raw and authentic way knowing that there will be a moment that is quite devastating for people. And we call that the crushing moment.

Bianca Bryson:
But from that point, what’s really crucial for us is that we bring that message of hope, because there actually is hope. 66,000 people are rescued at this point by IJM. So movement and traction is happening and that’s accelerating over time. So people, they need to hear the stories. They need to have that crushing moment because it is a reality, but then we’ve got to bring them on that hope journey because yeah, there is hope.

Mark Jones:
What do you mean by crushing moment?

Bianca Bryson:
It’s that moment where emotionally, it just feels too much. It’s that moment where people think, how could that honestly happen to somebody? And we begin to internalise it and we begin to maybe put ourselves in their shoes and imagine it from that perspective or in some of the cases, in fact, many of the cases and stories we deal with, we’re dealing with children. So lots of people, if I think about our primary supporter for IJM, they’re parents. And so they are thinking about that story as they hear it from the perspective of, what if that happened to my child? And it’s pretty devastating, but we can’t leave people there because that’s not the end of the story. It actually isn’t the end of the story. Yeah.

Mark Jones:
Well, obviously, you need that moment to galvanise people into action, right?

Bianca Bryson:
Absolutely.

Mark Jones:
So very quickly it’s, “What do I do now?” Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yes.

Mark Jones:
I think most of us would go to the, “Well, I’m going to share a story on social media. I’m going to comment, I’m going to like a thing, I’m going to join a thing. I’m going to subscribe to something,” right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah.

Mark Jones:
That’s fine, but I’m sure you want more too.

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah, absolutely. And there’s lots of ways people can get involved. You mentioned earlier justice advocates, we must have a group of people that go out. And we do justice advocate training, so that’s a way that they can educate themselves further than just hearing the stories. Naturally, we want people to advocate with the government. Australia actually contributes in a big way to a lot of these issues. If we’re talking modern slavery from a bonded and forced labour standpoint, that’s dealing with our supply chains and government is moving on that. We’ve had the Modern Slavery Act put in place in 2018, but there’s so much more that is still in parliament that needs to be moved in order for Australia’s demand to change. Or if I’m talking about some of our other casework like online sexual exploitation of children, which is a really heavy topic, the reality is Australians are the third highest contributor to that.

Bianca Bryson:
We can do something about that. We can advocate with our government, with our local MPs. We might gain more awareness through justice advocacy. And then obviously, you can always support us financially and various programmes we have in place such as ‘Freedom Partners’ with monthly giving at $31 and various other programmes.

Mark Jones:
So there’s a really interesting disconnect that’s worth exploring, which is our picture of the typical Australian, or maybe the national psyche as being generous and caring for one another. And then there’s this undercurrent that you’ve really tapped into that unfortunately, we don’t like to think about, we don’t like to acknowledge it exists, yet we know there is a whole justice system that is tackling that. And we celebrate those moments where the right people have been locked up. Right? There’s those two things and you are sort of – you’re playing in between those two spaces. You’re appealing to those who want to do a good thing, and you’re also reminding people that there’s this, if you like, shadow side to the community and how are we going to fix it. Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah.

Mark Jones:
So how do you bridge that as a marketer, as a storyteller? How do you inspire and also really kind of remind people there’s a heavy aspect to this?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Look, in the education process of it, I think everybody listens to the stories and says, “Well, that’s not me. I’m not doing that. I’m not contributing to that issue.” And look, it’s a very black and white narrative as to whether you’re contributing to OSEC (online sexual exploitation of children). But if we’re talking modern slavery topics and supply chains, well, reality is you probably are contributing to it in some way. Now, Australians-

Mark Jones:
Sorry. You’re talking about like consumer purchasing?

Bianca Bryson:
Consumer driven.

Mark Jones:
Right.

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Those types of issues. And look, I think overall, Australians, like you said, we are generous people. I do believe that. I think we’re loving people, we’re fun-loving people. But I think sometimes we can live not aware of our actions and our comfort and our lifestyles. And not that we will have to walk around feeling guilty about that, not at all, but there is always a little bit we can do. And Australians from a charity standpoint, they give a fair bit of money to charity. Really be conscious about where you’re giving your money because there’s so many wonderful causes out there, but just know also what your lifestyle’s contributing to it.

Mark Jones:
This is this psychology aspect of giving or even understanding the messages, which is “not my problem”. Right? So you can say, well, “over-fishing the oceans is not my problem. CO2, not my problem, our greenhouse policies,” on and on and on. Not my problem, not my problem. 

Bianca Bryson:
There is.

Mark Jones:
So if you think about this question of not my problem, you’re really speaking to an understanding of who people are, which is really the essence of marketing, right? Understanding your target audience, what are they like as people? So, where do you get your inspiration? Where do you get your data? How do you make sure that you really understand the hearts and minds of the people you’re trying to appeal to?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Look, data, you’ve mentioned that specifically. That’s an area, I think, that as an organisation locally here in Australia, we’re growing in because we’re only six years old here. So we’re at the stage where we are beginning to monitor that at a better rate and make decisions from it. But really, the psychology for us is about creating that empathy and that compassion that people innately have. We’re relational beings. It doesn’t matter who you are. As human beings, we are generally relational. And so again, that’s why we go back to that story of one, like “how do these people relate to each other?”

Mark Jones:
You kind of touched on data and sort of marketing and technology. To what extent is that important to you? Because if you think about broad marketing trends, MarTech is one of the biggest games in town, right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Absolutely.

Mark Jones:
So how do you approach that from your space in sort of the for purpose sector?

Bianca Bryson:
Yes. So we’re actually going into – just this next year, going into a whole lot of research that we’re going to commission. And the reason behind it is to gather more data behind what we’re doing. We are six years in, so we’ve just got to that stage where we can get some solid information around our current supporter base, but we want to expand that because we’re at a stage where we want to grow our awareness in the Australian population. So we’ve got some external research that we need to do aside from our supporters naturally with our MarTech. That is another area where we’re growing. But yeah, supporter journeys, these things are really crucial to us in how we’re bringing people along the journey. We’re not just leaving them where they are in that initial stage of hearing one story, maybe contributing that $31 a month, rather, how are they deepening to see that they can contribute in a bigger way?

Mark Jones:
I’m interested in the shift that went on for you connecting to this purpose idea. You’ve kind of gone from commercial and then into some kind of bigger sense of, there’s more for me out there. Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah.

Mark Jones:
What happened during that time?

Bianca Bryson:
Look, it might not be as exciting as you’re hoping, but I will tell you the truth of the story. So after I finished up at Disney, actually, I had my first daughter. And I think everybody in their career has a moment – you’ve been working for organisations that you either feel passionate about or that have just driven and worked for your career path. But I think we all get to this point in life where we’re wondering, why? What’s the point? What am I actually contributing to? 

Bianca Bryson:
So I reflected on that and I actually thought, “Well, I don’t know that I want to be a marketer anymore actually.” It’s been a wonderful career path, but-

Mark Jones:
Thanks for the memories.

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Just not sure that I want to keep going down that route.

Bianca Bryson:
And then when my second daughter came along, I had three people send me the job for International Justice Mission. And it was only at that point that suddenly the puzzle pieces came together for me and I thought, “Actually, all of these skills and experience that I’ve gained through this wonderful career that I really enjoyed and had a great time, can now be married together with feeling like I’m getting up in the morning and I’m going and making a difference with the skills that I’ve gained.”

Mark Jones:
I would actually say that is monumentally significant in your own life, because as a parent myself and you talk to any parent, your first child, that’s really – it does change everything. It’s a cliche that your life’s going to change, but it materially resets your worldview.

Bianca Bryson:
Absolutely.

Mark Jones:
Yeah. And so-

Bianca Bryson:
You’re thinking through their eyes, right? You’re like, “What am I handing over to them in this world? What legacy am I leaving?” And actually, that’s something that we often think about with our supporters at IJM, right? You want to be somebody who when your grandkids say – actually, let’s go back just to modern slavery. This is going to be an issue that say 15 years time, people are going to care about. It’s a bit like climate change. 15 years ago, no one cared. Now we all care about climate change. Modern slavery is going to be the same. And when your grandchild comes to you and says, “Hey, what did you do about this situation?” You want to be able to say you did something. You don’t have to work for the organisation, but we can do something. And so for me, that’s what it was. It’s “Let’s take the skills and make it more purposeful”.

Mark Jones:
I think that’s extraordinarily powerful because people who join organisations, who support organisations, and I’m seeing this across the board. We don’t do it in a tokenistic way anymore.

Bianca Bryson:
Yes. That’s right.

Mark Jones:
We want to know, are you an organisation with integrity? The rise of the B Corp movement, which we are also a member of, right? So ethics, worldview, integrity, the extent to which you actually live out whatever it is you believe, has become, if you feel like, a universal aspiration. So what strikes me about your story is you’re actually inviting people into that space. That’s a real challenge, right?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah, it is.

Mark Jones:
We have to live it out, but we also have to tell this very nuanced story.

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah, it is. And look, that’s the individual story, but I would even say just because my head thinks marketing and business, even for corporations, you can see corporations getting behind all these various causes, whatever it might be without labelling or mentioning any of them. But which one is your organisation going to stand for? Because just like an individual’s thinking about that, what are they going to support? What are they going to stand for? It’s what is the corporation going to stand for as an organisation? And I think people are expecting more from businesses. And so marketers have a real opportunity. This is not just CSR issues anymore. This is actually about brand marketing opportunity because your external environment’s driving it.

Mark Jones:
So Filtered Media, our organisation recently merged with Social Impact Institute. So we’re now known as Impact Institute. And that’s actually strategically driven by what you are just speaking about, which is purpose on its own as a statement is no longer good enough. Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Exactly.

Mark Jones:
We’re looking to see it worked out in real, tangible, authentic ways. But then even more importantly, if we look at that down the line, is how do I measure the impact of that? What change are you actually having? And so demand from consumers and business groups and someone is saying, “Show me how you are changing the world.”

Bianca Bryson:
Absolutely.

Mark Jones:
What does that look like? Right?

Bianca Bryson:
Absolutely.

Mark Jones:
In your case, what’s the impact of the number of people lifted out of slavery? And we can say X numbers of people lifted out of slavery, but then what happened? What was their family like? What was the impact on the community? How do they change that environment? And so this consciousness that’s going on to me is probably one of the most exciting things that’s happened in business for the longest time. We finally lifted CSR as it used to be known, and for purpose work out from, if you like, the periphery of business and organisations right into the centre.

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Absolutely. Look, I think just going back to the corporations piece and the CSR that you’re mentioning again, we can do that and we can address it as marketers or business professionals, CEOs, even as compliance. And just something that we do because well, we better because people expect it. Or we can do something really creative about it, and we can go above and beyond what people expect and then utilise that with goodwill in our brand. So I think about – we often will talk to CSR people and they’re always like, “Oh, well, that modern slavery statement’s got to get them in. Better make sure it’s got this, this and this.” But gosh, it’s hard to audit my supply chain and slavery exists seven-tiers down. Darn, how do I really find out if it’s there?

Bianca Bryson:
What about being creative and thinking about things like, let’s invest in slave free zones. Let’s invest in areas of the world where we might be sourcing from and invest in what could be in the future, a slave free zone, so that we can talk about that to our consumers to say, “We didn’t just tick some boxes because legislation said we needed to put a statement forward.” Although, can I just say, the heart behind that, because it’s compliant, that doesn’t matter. It’s good work. It is really great that people are doing that. But as marketers, again, looking at where are we going in the world? Where’s Australia consumers? What are they wanting to say in 10 years time? And how can we be ahead of the curve and our other competing brands to invest in creative ways that we can say we actually really made an impact and a difference because impact matters. So yeah, I think, let’s be creative about it.

Mark Jones:
Yeah. That’s so important because again, it’s the beginning of a journey and you need to see it as the beginning of a journey if you’ve started to say, “Hang on a minute, what’s our reason for existing? What’s our purpose and how do we show that?” So I think that’s really fantastic. And plenty of food for thought, I think, for people trying to connect your world to what they can do. Any other quick tips for what people can do to actually make a difference? What’s sort of your best advice that you would give people saying, how do I kind of practically do some of the things you were just talking about?

Bianca Bryson:
Yeah. Look, I think step one is always awareness. So if this is something that’s triggered some curiosity for you as a listener, then I think go and find out about it. You can certainly do that on our website as a starting point, which is ijm.org.au. But if you’re somebody who’s listening and you represent an organisation, can I encourage you, like I mentioned before, just to be creative and to think about, where is the world going? Where is our country going on this topic? Where do our consumers want to go? And be creative about how you address it. And of course, you can always contact IJM, but I think there’s lots of different ways that you can address that. And yeah, happy to support anything there. But if you’re an individual person wanting to know, I think again, starts with awareness. And then talk to your workplace, see if there’s some changes you can bring in there. Educate yourself, look at being an advocate with your local government. And certainly, you can always give.

Mark Jones:
Bianca Bryson, Chief Marketing and Partnerships Officer at International Justice Mission. It has been a pleasure to have you the show., to meet you and to reconnect with IJM.

Bianca Bryson:
Thank you. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it.

Mark Jones:
I hope you enjoyed the conversation I had with Bianca – I loved it! It was great to talk with her about how International Justice Mission is working towards its vision of rescuing victims of slavery and other violence. IJM, I think, is a really awesome  brand, and its a great example of an organisation that harnesses storytelling to move consumers to support its mission, and take action. I’d like to challenge you to consider what stories your brand could tell to communicate its purpose and amplify its impact. Now before I go, a quick reminder – if you haven’t already, search for The CMO Show on your favourite podcast app and subscribe so you never miss out on every episode we bring out – in fact, every fortnight. And thanks of course for joining us again on The CMO Show. As always, it’s been a pleasure. Until next time.

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